Thursday, April 2, 2020

How to Make Your Own Face Mask: Guest Post by Anthony Manno

Pat Manno & Anthony Manno
In wake of CODIV-19 and Michigan's "Stay Home, Stay Safe" order, Manno Clothing and Tailoring in Dearborn, MI has decided to keep their tailoring shop open to construct protective masks. They have used their knowledge, tools, and materials to create a face mask assembly line. To date, they've donated over 1000 masks to Metro-Detroit hospitals.

Anthony Manno was kind enough to create a guide so that you can create a mask for yourself, your family, or to create a donation assembly line of your own (the following was written by Anthony Manno):

Creating masks has been an absolute joy to our staff. It gave us purpose during a time of closure and encouragement during a time of crisis. Each mask makes a difference for a nurse, pharmacist, grocery store worker, or other individual at risk of exposure. Even if it takes a few to get it right, stay with it and know your creation will make a difference for someone.

Materials & Supplies:
100% cotton fabric – cut into 6.5” x 9.5” rectangles
¼” elastic OR 18” strands of cotton/nylon binding
Fusible interfacing (optional)
Sewing machine
Iron
Scissors
Ruler

Step 1
Instructions:

1. Start by cutting fabric into 6.5” x 9.5” rectangles. Once fabric is cut, face the pattered sides together so they match up evenly. It will appear that the mask is inside out.
a. At this point, you may apply fusible interfacing in between the fabric pieces if you so choose.

Step 2
2. Sew along the 9.5” side using ¼” seam allowance. Make sure to leave space in the center of the fabric to turn mask right side out.


Step 3
3. Cut two pieces of elastic (no longer than 6 inches) OR four strips of binding (19 inches each). Sew across sides making sure to secure the elastic or binding in place.
a. If you choose to use binding, knot one end to avoid unraveling when tying the finished product.


Step 4



4. Now, turn the mask right side out and press the mask flat. Fold in three pleats on each side an equal distance apart from each other.
a. You can use pins to keep the pleats in place if you prefer. The pleats should stack on top of each other.


Step 5

5. Press the pleats into place and try on your homemade mask!

To learn more about Pat, Anthony, and Manno Clothing, please visit www.MannoClothing.com or call 313-561-1419. 

Saturday, March 14, 2020

An Important Message from Janet Davis Cleaners

At Janet Davis Cleaners, nothing is more important than ensuring the safety and health of our staff and customers. We appreciate the trust you place in us daily for your garment and textile care needs.

Our team has met and reviewed the findings of the Dry Cleaning and Laundry Institute (DLI) after they've conferred with the CDC.

We want to assure you that our textile cleaning process is effective against viruses (coronavirus, influenza, common colds, etc.).

Additionally, from the outset of this coronavirus news we've increased our cleaning and sanitization of all common touch points within our stores. We are closely monitoring and following the guidance from the CDC on personal hygiene and cleaning standards to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other communicable diseases.

As a means of practicing social distancing, we'd like to remind you we can pickup and deliver your items within our service area at no additional charge. If regular pickup and delivery isn't for you, we can also do this for you on a one time or occasional basis.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Mens Button Down Dress Shirt Fabrics and Materials

Photo Credit: Menswear Market

True style isn’t about pomp and flash, it’s a matter of getting the details right.

When it comes to dress, all elements matter, from your watch down to your socks. Your shirt selection is arguably one of the most important of these elements, so you’ll want to take the time to truly understand what each shirting fabric is ideal for.

In this post, we’ll dive deep into the nitty-gritty of men’s button down shirt fabrics. By knowing the differences between basic shirt fabrics and weaves, you’ll find selecting the right option for each occasion much simpler.

Here we’ll break down what distinguishes one fabric from another and tackle what makes each weave special. Once you understand these details, you’ll be set to look stylish and appropriate, whether you’re going to an important meeting, wedding, funeral or for work.

Fibers/Materials

Before jumping headfirst into fabrics, here’s a very brief run-through of the most common fibers you’ll find in men’s shirts.

Cotton: The majority of shirts in your closet are likely cotton, and there is good reason for that. Cotton is wonderful fiber. In addition to its softness, cotton is a natural and breathable option, thus making it easy to wear even in high temperatures. It is, however, prone to wrinkles (we'll discuss non-iron in just a bit).

Linen: Like cotton, linen is a natural fiber. It’s even better suited than its counterpart for hot days. To boot, linen is quite beautiful, though a common complaint is that it wrinkles even more easily and those wrinkles are harder to remove than with cotton.

Polyester: A man-made fiber that is stain and wrinkle resistant. It typically isn't used for button down shirts because it lacks body.

Rayon: A manufactured fiber that is made from naturally occurring sources. Rayon can wear like cotton or polyester, but typically needs to be cared for like wool.

Wool: Used in thicker sport shirts. Typically darker in color. Most often worn in cold weather. Needs to be dry cleaned.

Spandex: The addition of spandex to cotton shirts has become popular, but seems to cause shirts with this fabric blend to wear out faster than their all-cotton counterparts.

Fabrics (Weaves)

Poplin/Broadcloth: Poplin is a straightforward fabric consisting of a one-over and one-under weave, commonly referred to as a plain or tabby weave. This seemingly simple fabric has a smooth texture and is quite sturdy. Poplin regulates temperature well, and can work across seasons.

Due to its smoothness, it showcases patterns very crisply. It’s also quite versatile, as it can work well in formal settings as well as for daily 9-to-5 wear. Keep in mind, however, that poplin wrinkles easily.

When it comes to fabric classifications, poplin and broadcloth are often used interchangeably. Each utilizes a tabby weave structure and may appear almost indistinguishable from its sister fabric, however, there is a subtle distinction between the two. The difference is simple: poplins consist of yarns of varying sizes while broadcloths utilize only one thread size across the warp and weft.

Oxford: Durable oxford fabrics have long been popular for casual shirts and can work well in more informal business environments. Unlike broadcloths or poplins, these fabrics utilize a durable basket weave. This basket weave structure produces a thicker fabric that is often quite comfortable and warm.

Twill: It’s easy to pick out a twill fabric from among the other selections here due to the fabric’s distinctive weave. Twill showcases a beautiful diagonal pattern, unlike the more grid-like poplins or oxfords.

Twills are quite strong, are often lightweight fabrics, and they don’t easily accumulate dirt. In addition to these benefits, twill fabrics do not wrinkle as easily as several of the other options on this list.

Hounds-tooth, herringbone, and denim are all examples of commonly utilized twill fabrics. Just because your jeans consist of a twill fabric, however, don’t necessarily pass this cloth by when it comes to dress shirts. Twills tend to drape well and are more wrinkle resistant than poplins, broadcloths, and oxfords.

Chambray: Though chambray often has a denim-like appearance and durability, in fact, it consists of an entirely different weave structure. Similar to poplin and broadcloth, chambray is a tabby weave, not a twill.

The denim-esque look comes from the colors of the thread used. Rather than weave the warp and weft with the same color, chambray fabric incorporates white threads in the weft and a different color on the warp. In turn, this forms a subtle check-like pattern.

Though chambray shirts aren’t welcome in formal offices, they are often now acceptable fabrics to wear in more casual work environments, particularly in creative industries.

Non-Iron

Non-iron cotton shirts aren't a special cotton or even a special weave. Non-iron shirts can still be ironed. When a shirt is labeled non-iron, that means the cotton was treated with a substance (that involves formaldehyde) which helps to prevent wrinkles.

With these shirt fabric basics in hand, you’re well-prepared to make the right dress choices for your workplace and lifestyle when you go shopping for new button down shirts. Each fabric and weave is ideally suited for different environments, seasons, and individual preferences.

Don’t forget to take great care of your shirts and dress shirts to keep them in top shape. At Janet Davis Cleaners, we take great pride in caring for your finest shirts. Learn more about how we take care of your button down shirts for work, special occasions, and more now.

Monday, November 4, 2019

Everything You Can and Cannot Dry Clean

Anyone familiar with the television show The Jeffersons knew the main character owned a dry cleaning business. It was his way of moving up and out of his low-income neighborhood in Harlem.

To dry clean clothing and items doesn't mean, no fluids. The opposite is true. But when it comes to taking your personal belongings to the dry cleaners use caution. 

Some items need dry cleaning, but others don't. 

If you're unsure about which clothing or bedding items need the professional care of the cleaners, it's okay. Follow along as we discuss what you can and can't dry clean.

What Is Dry Cleaning?

Dry cleaning is the washing of delicate fabrics with other solvents than water (the most abundant solvent on the planet). Water may damage fabrics like silk, leather, and wool, so dry cleaning helps preserve the quality, according to Live Science. 

History of Dry Cleaning

Dry cleaning dates back to 79 when fullers would cleanse clothing with ammonia made from urine, lye, and clay known as fullers earth. The mixture of these items removed stains well.

The first modern dry cleaner was Thomas Jennings, a free African-American and the first to receive a U.S. patent in 1821 to dry clean clothing through "dry sourcing." His tailoring and dry cleaning business thrived in New York City. 

Unfortunately, the flammable petroleum-based chemicals used in the process caused significant risk for fire. 

A handful of solvents are used today and all have a much lower risk of catching fire. 

What Can You Dry Clean?

Before tossing that sweater or jacket into the washing machine, read the label. While checking out the label during shopping is best, if you missed this step pre-check-out, it's okay.

But reading the label saves you the frustration of ruining that new dress or comforter.

If the label suggests machine washing, then you're in the clear. When the words dry clean only appear, it's wise to abide by this suggestion. 

Machine washing items meant for dry cleaning could severely damage the material and appearance. People learn the hard way to not machine wash cashmere in hot water. 

Taking your clothing to the dry cleaners can save you time in your busy schedule and reduce the risk of damaging the fabric.

Fabrics that need dry cleaning include:

  • Silk
  • Velvet
  • Suede
  • Leather
  • Rayon
  • Wool

Silk

When people mention the word silk, it creates thoughts of prosperity and luxury. Silk is delicate and should be dry cleaned. When selecting a dry cleaner, learn if they have experience with dry cleaning silk items. You don't want your treasure silk blouse ruined by inexperience.

Velvet and Suede

Velvet and suede feel nice but need dry cleaning if dirty. Pure velvet is made of acetate and viscose. It should get dry cleaned to keep the material looking and feeling beautiful. 

Suede material feels pleasant to the touch. There's nothing better than a comfortable pair of suede shoes. Unfortunately, suede stains easily even from water, so dry cleaning is the best option for removing dirt.

Leather

Leather deserves dry cleaning treatment (although it does require a special cycle). The water darkens and damages the fabric, according to How to Clean Stuff. It's not ideal to wear a leather coat during inclement weather unless you want the rain or snow to change the appearance.

Wool

Wool can shrink in the dryer and usually comes with a dry clean only label. To lessen the risk of damage, take your wool items to the cleaners. 

Rayon

Rayon is a semisynthetic material. Dyed rayon could bleed, lose its shape, and shrink during machine washing.  

What Shouldn't You Dry Clean?

Thank goodness, not all clothing requires the dry cleaning process. 

But it's crucial to pay attention to the garment material and the label suggestions. Certain fabrics like cotton, nylon, polyester, spandex, acrylic, and acetate don't need dry cleaning. Durable materials can withstand the exposure to water, detergents, and a dryer machine.

If you're unsure as to whether a sweater, t-shirt, or slacks should get the rinse cycle check the tags. After learning if machine washing is okay, then select the right water temperature and detergent.

When in doubt, lay an item flat or hang dry to avoid shrinkage or fading.

Dry Cleaning Grey Area

Some items with dry clean labels can be hand washed. Cashmere falls into this category because handwashing can soften the material over time. 

If you decide to handwash cashmere use a mild detergent and press out the water. Don't wring the fabric and lie flat to dry for several days. Wools and cashmeres are susceptible to damage when wet. 

Washing silk at home is possible, but it takes patience and care.

Use lukewarm water to wash and cool to rinse. Adding a water softener may improve the quality of the cleaning. White vinegar could preserve the color of the silk. But don't soak the items for too long. Rinse thoroughly and roll in a towel to remove water. Then hang away from direct sunlight and heat to dry.

Velvet and polyester blends are safe for machine washing in lukewarm water to avoid shrinking.

If you're still unsure, contact a dry cleaner to ask questions about whether to wash or dry clean. 

Decide For Yourself

The decision of whether to dry clean or machine wash is up to you.

Read the labels and use your best judgment. If handwashing can remove a stain without ruining a garment, then do it. But if you want the security of knowing professionals cleaned your clothing go for dry cleaning.

For more information on whether dry cleaning or machine washing is right, please read our blog

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Which Gowns Respond to Wedding Dress Cleaning and Restoration?

Thinking of getting wedding dress cleaning and restoration done? Here are the kind of gowns that respond best to this treatment.

A bride isn’t going to trust just anyone with her wedding dress cleaning and restoration. And who can blame her? Whether it’s new or vintage, it’s not just a gown, it’s a symbol of love, trust, and promise.

Picking out a wedding dress is one of the most exciting parts of the planning process for most brides-to-be. Whether you pick a new dress or want to wear one worn by a member of your family, you'll want to make sure the dress is clean and prepared to be stored properly after the fact. Keep reading to learn more about wedding dress cleaning and restoration. 

Gown Fabrics Matter

There’s no better way to have the matriarch of your family be a part of your special day than to wear her wedding gown. Whether it’s your mother’s or grandmother’s dress, you couldn’t imagine your happy day without it.

Your mom carries it down the stairs, opens the box, and– Gasp! It’s, uh... yellow. And stained. And something might have been eating it.

You’re baffled. How did this happen? And what can you do about it?

If you’ve got a dress that has yellowed, don’t panic just yet. Wedding dress cleaning and restoration services can do wonders. But first, a cleaner must identify the fibers used in a gown before attempting to clean it.

Non-silk fabrics can often withstand the cleaning agents needed to restore a gown to its original bright white. Silk wedding dresses, they’re a completely different story. Remember that vintage silk dresses were never truly white. Modern silk that is bright white has been dyed after the thread was harvested.

Cotton and linen are much easier to restore than silk. The tighter the weave, the more difficult it is to press out wrinkles. Silk satin is quite difficult to press out smooth again. Net or lace is easiest.

As for silk illusion net, you’re probably not going to save that. Silk illusion veils were popular in the first half of the 1900s. They look great new, but unfortunately, the fabric has a short shelf life. It gets all crunchy and dissolves in water if you try to clean it.

Light Fabrics Yellow

Whites and shades of pastel are especially susceptible to yellowing. It’s due to a degradation of the colorless fibers that compose the fabric. As they decay, they turn yellow. And as the decay continues, they progress from a light yellow to a moderate yellow color.

Not all vintage gowns need color restoration. Fabrics such as rayon, cotton, or other non-silk fabrics may age in an attractive way. A very pale yellow wedding dress sometimes has a vintage look that you might not what to change. Think royal princess. Perhaps only a cleaning is necessary. Cleaning and restoration are not the same thing. 

Dresses Get Contaminated

During manufacturing, chemicals added to process the fabric can lead to yellowing. Textile softeners sometimes include chemicals that comprise chlorine, oils, and even animal fats. These products all decompose in long-term storage. And they can make your fabric decay as well.

They also attract dirt, dust, and oils during the wedding day. While in storage, they ramp up the speed of yellowing. Exposing a gown to direct sunlight, humidity, or extreme heat can impact its fibers long term too.

Atmospheric pollutants also play a part. Nitrogen, found in the air, combines with certain fabrics to cause yellowing. Also to blame are automobile pollution, home heating systems, and industrial air pollution. That's why preservation facilities have state-of-the-art air circulation and purification systems.

In storage, polyethylene (plastic) bags cause phenolic yellowing of fabrics. This yellowing also occurs from storage in cardboard, papers, and other wrapping materials. Keep dresses safe from these contaminants if you want to restore them later.

Stains Happen

Stains can rapidly advance decay of fibers. Especially deep stains. And attempts to treat those stains can cause even more damage to the gown.

Sometimes stains aren’t that noticeable, like those from champagne. But the sugar is in the fibers and contributing to decay. If dresses are left with even slight stains, they can come out of storage dark brown or even black.

On the wedding day, a dress is exposed to all kinds of contaminants. Do you ever wear white? Then you know how dirt, grass stains, and food love to show up on white clothing. Wedding gowns are no exception.

Body lotions, perfumes, and sweat all do a number on a dress, leading to stains. Keep these products off of your dress as much as possible.

Wedding Dress Cleaning and Restoration

Okay. It looks like the old dress survived the wedding day without any obvious staining. But most of the staining on a wedding gown is invisible to the naked eye. After decades of storage, invisible sweat or sugar stains turn into brown splotches. Those brown monsters never stop eating away at the fabrics in the gown.

If you need to remove these stains, only water-based solutions remove them. This requires the whole dress to be soaked and restored to the true color. Water (plus our formula) dissolves the oxidation that provides a gown’s heirloom color. Dissolving stains is tricky business because fabrics can dissolve right along with them.

Holes, Stains, No Problem!

Dresses with holes, stains, or in need of excessive alterations may be hard to restore. And doing so might be expensive. Fragile gowns may need to be lined and mended onto the lining to make sure they last through the wedding day. Some brides opt to wear such fragile gowns only for the ceremony and change into a newer gown for the reception.

Color restoration requires removal of metal buttons because it rusts in the solution. Metal hooks and eyes are also removed for the same reason. Pearls can lose their polished covering and look opaque. Fabrics may shrink in different ways and have to pressed back into shape. Or the hem may need to be removed and resewn.

Get Your Gown Cleaned and Restored

On your wedding day, the two of you will unite as one. There’s no greater expression of love or acceptance. But to have the happiest, most perfect day, you’ll want a stunning dress. You’ll want to command the attention of everyone present, especially your partner.

Call and ask about our wedding dress cleaning and restoration services. You can count on us to give your dress the personal attention it needs. We follow a multi-step process to erase years of storage. Put on that dress and walk down the aisle as the radiant bride you deserve to be!

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Does This Really Need Dry Cleaning? Dishing the Dirt on ''Dry Clean Only''

How serious is that ''dry clean only'' label on your favorite cashmere sweater? Here's what you need to know about dry cleaning labels and fabrics!

The average household spends on average $500 per year on dry cleaning expenses. While this may seem like a steep annual bill, it's nothing compared to the countless money that's wasted on clothing that's damaged due to improper cleaning methods. After all, do you really want to sacrifice your favorite dress or suit simply because you ignored the dry clean only tag?

The good news is, you can avoid damaging any more clothing by being on the lookout for some essential signs that your piece requires dry cleaning.

If you're not willing to let go of one more piece of clothing, read on to get the lowdown on what does and doesn't require dry cleaning.

The Benefits of Dry Cleaning

Before we get into what does and doesn't need to be dry cleaned, it's important to be aware of the multiple benefits of dry cleaning and why people choose it for all of their clothes, even the ones that may not need it.

Dry cleaning is remarkably less abrasive, even on the clothes that aren't marked with a dry clean only label. If you're looking to keep your colors fresher and for a longer period of time, dry cleaning is an ideal option. This results in less money spent on clothes over time.

Professional dry cleaners also tend to pay close attention to detail, meaning they'll be able to zone in on the little stains and discolorations that you may have already given up on.

The majority of people simply don't have the time to wash their clothes themselves. If you think about it, there are much more productive things you can be doing than washing your clothes. This is where dry cleaning easily comes into play.

Dry cleaners are also particularly effective for those large item pieces like drapes, rugs, or slipcovers that seem like a chore when attempting to do them at home.

What's Really Dry Clean Only

Now, let's take a closer look at which of your pieces need dry cleaning every time. Be on the lookout for these essential signs that your item need to be dry cleaned even if you didn't spot the direction on the tag.

Recognize Labels

There's a good chance that over time the tiny writing on your label may have faded. However, look for the small icon shaped like an iron on the tag to help signify that an item is not made for your washing machine.

Pay Attention to the Material

You can typically tell whether or not a clothing item will do well in your washing machine by simply paying attention to the material.

Any of your more delicate fabrics like satin, wool, velvet, and silk are not designed to be washed in high temperatures or to be used in machines. Not only are these fabrics not made to go into your washing machine, but they will also do some serious damage in your dryer as well.

When loading up your washing machine be sure that everything that goes in is either polyester, linen, nylon, or cotton. Even then there may be some exceptions to the rule.

Additional Accessories and Trim

Even if the material being washed is one of your approved materials, there are some situations in which a garment should still be brought in to a cleaner.

For example, high-end suits and dresses should still be brought into a cleaner to make sure that the lines and fit aren't affected during the washing process.

Any items with collars, or additional lining should be brought into your dry cleaner as the harsh movement of a washing machine can gradually undo the seam that's been sewn into place.

If you're looking to have a garment wood handmade lacework or embroidery cleaned, stay clear of the washing machine that will certainly rip and damage this intricate work

Finally, your favorite beaded and sequence items won't hold up well in washing machines or dryers. These glued-on accessories tend to become undone when washing machine and the thin threads easily tear.

Your favorite delicates aren't worth damaging. The more dainty they appear the more likely it is that they should be saved for your dry cleaner.

Tricky Spots and Stains

There are some stains that only a professional knows how to get out. If one of your favorite items have faced the wrath of some spilled wine, blood, or even oil, don't give up on it just yet.

A quick trip to the dry cleaners may be all you need to get your favorite outfit back into Tip-Top shape. You'll find your dry cleaners know exactly which method to apply to get the stain out without causing any further damage.

This is particularly important with keepsakes like wedding dresses or baptism gowns that you want to hold onto forever without the appearance of harsh stains.

Items that Need Extra Pressing

Nothing is as crisp as a suit straight from the dry cleaners. While you can always take the time to iron, there are some items that really need professional-grade ironing to maintain their look and quality.

Fortunately, dry cleaners know how to perfectly steam each piece for a classic and wrinkle-free appearance.

Finding the Right Dry Cleaner to Handle it All

Once you've found out which items are dry clean only, it's time to find the perfect dry cleaner to do the job. Look for dry cleaners with years of experience in maintaining the look and quality of various types of clothing items.

If you're looking for more information on protecting your clothing and dry cleaning services check out our blog today.

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Monique Lhuillier: Profile of a Couture Wedding Gown Designer

Photo: Getty Images

Though today her brand is famous for its celebrity following, Monique Lhuillier’s couture wedding gowns are designed to make real women feel stunning.

The designer has the rare ability to convey both timelessness and modernity in her gowns, seamlessly combining well-worn traditions with fresh touches which brides worldwide find irresistible.

Since opening her business 3 decades ago, Lhuillier’s designs have only grown in popularity and with good reason. Read on to learn more about her and to find out just what’s so special about her bridal collections.

A Brief Biography

The glamour behind Monique Lhuillier's couture wedding gowns doesn’t just lie in lushly romantic cuts, luxe fabrics, and careful detailing. It’s also to be found in the designer’s worldly background.

Lhuillier is the daughter of former model Amparito Llamas and Vietnamese-born entrepreneur Michel Lhuillier and spent her early years in the Philippines. The designer has expressed that her early love of fashion emerged from observing her elegant mother.

When she was small, her mother sewed and designed the children’s clothes. As Lhullier grew older, local seamstresses created them for her. In her early teens, she began sketching designs together with these creators, thus further entrenching her love for and deep understanding of fashion design and dress structure.

From an early age, Monique Lhuillier was drawn to formalwear, and this focus continued into her days at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles. Yet it wasn’t until she began to plan her own wedding that the seed of the brand was sown.

A young bride-to-be at 21 years old, Monique Lhuillier unsurprisingly was on the lookout for something fresh and modern for her wedding day. It should have been easy to find what she was looking for, but the options available were much too stuffy and conservative for her sophisticated taste.

Though she found a gown in the end, it was the search for the perfect dress that sparked her desire to specialize in wedding couture. To her surprise, Lhuillier discovered just how significant the wedding industry was and that it was a field where she could make her mark.

It was in the mid-90s that she launched her business quite humbly from her home in Malibu. Lhuillier admits that she jumped boldly into the industry with a line of 5 gowns and without a business plan. Yet, she quickly got serious, setting up an office with a group of trusted seamstresses and promoting designs to wedding dress boutiques.

By 2001, she opened her first Beverly Hills shop. Amazingly, Lhuillier had no public relations strategy in place, yet celebrity stylists started reaching out. In 2004, her designs popped up at the Emmys, Britney Spears hired her in secret to design her wedding dress, and in 2005 Martha Stewart Weddings launched her into the big-time with a feature including her wedding designs.

Celebrities including First Lady Michelle Obama, A-list actors Gwyneth Paltrow, Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Michelle Gellar, and Emma Stone, as well as musicians Katy Perry, and Taylor Swift have all worn her stunning designs.

Michelle Obama has sported them over and over, including to important events such as a visit to Pope Francis and the White House Correspondents’ dinner. The first time Gwyneth Paltrow wore Monique Lhuillier was in 2010, donning a svelte corseted white number with a cutout design and a scallop-edged bottom. It was far from the last time she would chose the designer. Reese Witherspoon is a regular too, wearing a blush pink wedding gown to her ceremony in 2011, though perhaps her most famous outfit from the designer was a black and white lace long-sleeved dress dotted with 3-D butterflies. In Taylor Swift’s new music video for the single “Me,” she sported a black and white mid-calf Lhuillier party dress with a scattered multi-colored floral design.

In addition to her celebrity endorsements, Lhuillier is the recipient of several prestigious awards including the Philippines’ Presidential Medal of Merit as well as a membership in the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

Monique Lhuillier’s Design Inspiration

The designer’s spring 2020 bridal collection has an unusual inspiration: Italian gardens. Lhuillier set out to create designs which, like the gardens of Italy, are based in traditional design but retain an element of ever-present freshness. Though she’s tapped into the current trend of reaching into the past for wedding design concepts, she’s also utilizing fresh new trends like using color in wedding gowns. For Lhuiller’s current collection, that color focus is centered on shades of green.

Monique Lhuillier's spring 2019 bridal collection, however, had a much more timely inspiration: Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s nuptials. For this season, she was thinking royal, with all the pomp and splendor of a wedding fit for a princess, but with the elegant simplicity Markle is known for. More traditional full skirts and mermaid silhouettes dominated the season’s wedding dresses, a striking departure from fall 2018’s white leather bridal moto jacket.

One collection from spring 2015 drew inspiration from the Edwardian era portraits of American painter John Singer Sargent. Monique Lhuillier imagined her brides seeing themselves embodying the glamour of the painter’s works - so much so that they would become “a living picture.”

The designs for these seasons seem so different, but there are certain threads that are ever-present in Lhuillier’s gowns. As the designer puts it, the brand is all about “beauty, femininity, and really making a woman feel beautiful to be in the clothes.” Her designs hinge on the glamour she inherited from her mother with the sophistication she brings from decades of designing.

With a vision like that, it’s no wonder she’s found such success.

Closing Thoughts

Couture wedding gowns like Lhuillier’s are beyond precious. The designer’s dresses are heirloom treasures to be passed on through the generations.

The amount of time, care, consideration, and creativity that go into a Monique Lhuillier wedding dresses are priceless. If you are lucky enough to have one, it’s your duty to care for it to the best of your ability.

At Janet Davis Cleaners, we specialize in cleaning, steaming, and preserving couture wedding gowns with the utmost care. With over 60 years of experience, we have the expertise needed to handle your high-end dress.

Visit Janet Davis Cleaners to learn more or call us today at 248-543-0340. We can’t wait to help make your wedding day just magical.

References

https://www.marthastewartweddings.com/404709/monique-lhuillier-wedding-dress-designer-facts
https://moniquelhuillier.com/pages/about
https://born2invest.com/articles/bridal-gown-designer-monique-lhuillier/
https://fashionista.com/2017/06/monique-lhuillier-wedding-dresses-bridal-interview
https://bellabridesmaids.com/blogs/bridesmaids-buzz/meet-the-designer-our-interview-with-monique-lhuillier
https://charactermedia.com/monique-lhuillier-designs-wedding-gown-for-her-fashion-role-model-her-mother/
https://www.insideweddings.com/news/fashion/up-close-and-personal-with-monique-lhuillier-2/4325/
https://www.notablebiographies.com/newsmakers2/2007-Co-Lh/Lhuillier-Monique.html
https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/bridal-spring-2020/monique-lhuillier
https://www.theknot.com/fashion/monique-lhuillier-wedding-dresses